International Commercial Law Blog

UNCITRAL publishes its endorsement of the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts 2010

The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) has published the Report on its forty-fifth session (25 June – 6 July 2012) at which it decided to endorse the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts 2010.

See Report of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law, forty-fifth session (25 June-6 July 2012)

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San Marino Accedes to United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods

With its accession to the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (“CISG”), San Marino becomes the 78th State Party to the Convention. The Convention will enter into force for San Marino on 1 March 2013.

The adoption of the CISG by San Marino has taken place in the context of a joint initiative between the Government of San Marino and the UNCITRAL Secretariat aimed at modernizing the law of international sale of goods and of electronic transactions in that country.

The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods provides an equitable and modern uniform framework for the contract of sale, which is the backbone of international trade in all countries, irrespective of their legal tradition or level of economic development. The CISG is therefore considered to be one of the core conventions in international trade law.

The CISG, which has been adopted by a large number of major trading countries, establishes a comprehensive code of legal rules governing the formation of contracts for the international sale of goods, the obligations of the buyer and seller, remedies for breach of contract and other aspects of the contract.

See 1980 – United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG)

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Liechtenstein Accedes to Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards

With its accession to the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (also known as the New York Convention), effected on 7 July 2011, Liechtenstein becomes the 146th State party to the Convention. The Convention will enter into force for Liechtenstein on 5 October 2011.

The “New York” Convention is widely recognized as a foundation instrument of international arbitration and requires courts of contracting States to give effect to an agreement to arbitrate when seized of an action in a matter covered by an arbitration agreement and to recognize and enforce awards made in other States, subject to specific limited exceptions.

The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (“UNCITRAL”) is the core legal body of the United Nations system in the field of international trade law. Its mandate is to remove legal obstacles to international trade by progressively modernizing and harmonizing trade law. It prepares legal texts in a number of key areas such as international commercial dispute settlement, electronic commerce, insolvency, international payments, sale of goods, transport law, procurement and infrastructure development. UNCITRAL also provides technical assistance to law reform activities, including assisting Member States to review and assess their law reform needs and to draft the legislation required to implement UNCITRAL texts. The UNCITRAL Secretariat is located in Vienna and maintains a website at www.uncitral.org.

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Incoterms 2010

The Incoterms rules have become an essential part of the daily language of trade. They have been incorporated in contracts for the international sale of goods and provide rules and guidance to importers, exporters, lawyers, transporters, insurers and students of international trade.

The purpose of Incoterms is to provide a set of international rules for the interpretation of the most commonly used trade terms in foreign trade. Thus, the uncertainties of different interpretations of such terms in different countries can be avoided or at least reduced to a considerable degree.

Frequently, parties to a contract are unaware of the different trading practices in their respective countries. This can give rise to misunderstandings, disputes and litigation, with all the waste of time and money that this entails.

In order to remedy these problems, the International Chamber of Commerce first published in 1936 a set of international rules for the interpretation of trade terms, first conceived in 1921.

These rules were known as “Incoterms 1936″. Amendments and additions were later made in 1953, 1967, 1976, 1980, 1990, 2000 and presently in 2010 in order to bring the rules in line with current international trade practices.

As of 1 January 2011 the eighth edition, “Incoterms 2010″, shall have effect. Among other changes therein affected all of the five terms in section D are obsoleted and replaced with the following three: DAT (Delivered at Terminal), DAP (Delivered at Place), and DDP (Delivered Duty Paid). Such new terms apply to all modes of transport.

Rules for any mode or modes of transport:

  • EXW   Ex Works
  • FCA    Free Carrier
  • CPT     Carriage Paid To
  • CIP     Carriage And Insurance Paid To
  • DAT    Delivered At Terminal
  • DAP    Delivered At Place
  • DDP    Delivered Duty Paid

Rules for sea and inland waterway transport:

  • FAS     Free Alongside Ship
  • FOB    Free On Board
  • CFR    Cost And Freight
  • CIF     Cost, Insurance and Freight

It should be stressed that the scope of Incoterms is limited to matters relating to the rights and obligations of the parties to the contract of sale with respect to the delivery of goods sold (in the sense of “tangibles”, not including “intangibles” such as computer software) as they help traders avoid costly misunderstandings by clarifying the tasks, costs and risks involved in the delivery of goods from sellers to buyers.

The current Incoterms 2000 rules are endorsed by UNCITRAL.

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UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules 2010

On 25 June 2010, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law adopted the revised UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules (the “Rules”).

The original UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules were adopted in 1976 and have been used for the settlement of a broad range of disputes, including disputes between private commercial parties where no arbitral institution is involved, investor-State disputes, State-to-State disputes and commercial disputes administered by arbitral institutions.

The revision is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of arbitration under the Rules and does not alter the original structure of the text, its spirit or drafting style.

The Rules, as revised, include more provisions dealing with, among others, multiple parties arbitration and joinder, liability, and a procedure to object to experts appointed by the arbitral tribunal. A number of innovative features contained in the Rules aim to enhance procedural efficiency, including revised procedures for the replacement of an arbitrator, the requirement for reasonableness of costs and a review mechanism regarding the costs of arbitration. The Rules also include more detailed provisions on interim measures.

The Rules will take effect from 15 August 2010 and will be presumed to apply to all arbitration agreements referring to UNCITRAL arbitration concluded after that date, unless the parties have agreed otherwise.

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